Parenthe-seize the Divided List!

When we write a list within a sentence, we often want to make the structure absolutely clear by numbering or lettering the items in the series. For students and junior scholars, the divided list is even more important, as it is the well-known writers who can assume that their readers won’t abandon overly complex, understructured passages. When dividing a list, make sure that: numbers or letters appear within a set of parentheses (rather than simply following the number or letter with one parenthesis) elements are grammatically parallel (all nouns, for instance) appropriate punctuational dividers are used the imposed structure illuminates rather than obscures meaning the divisions do not unintentionally imply hierarchy That itself could be formatted as a divided list within a sentence: The key aspects of serializing are the following: (1) numbers or letters appear within a set of parentheses; (2) elements are grammatically parallel; (3) appropriate punctuational dividers are used; (4) the imposed structure illuminates rather than obscures meaning; and (5) the divisions do not unintentionally imply hierarchy. Let’s say that Michel Foucault wanted to make this complicated sentence a bit more organized to the reading eye: Bentham’s Panopticon is the architectural figure of this composition. We know the principle on which it was based: at the periphery, an annular building; at the centre, a tower; this tower is pierced with wide windows that open onto the inner side of the ring; the peripheric building is divided into cells, each of which extends the whole width of the building; they have two windows, one on the inside, corresponding to the windows of the tower; the other, on...